The July 2019 Open Organization Ambassadors Report

Contents

{1} Editor’s Notes
{2} Ambassador Publications
{3} Site Stats
{4} Monthly Highlights
{5} Looking Ahead
{6} Ambassador Notes

{1} Editor’s Notes

Welcome to the July newsletter, dear readers! The open organization community was busy last month, and I’m pleased to provide this update on all we’ve achieved as we barrel into the second half of 2019.

In July, we published four new articles, including a special, two-part series on continuous learning and adaptability from new author Colin Willis. Overall, our materials generated 14,539 page views. Volumes in the Open Organization book series received 248 downloads, and our monthly newsletter achieved an open rate of 56.33%.

Please read on to learn more!

Editorially yours,
Bryan

{2} Ambassador Publications

(Ambassadors did not publish any articles on Opensource.com in July.)

{3} Site Stats

Our top articles of the month were:

  1. Jim Hall: “From e-learning to m-learning: Open education’s next move”
    https://opensource.com/open-organization/19/7/m-learning-open-education
    Views: 1,303

  2. Colin Willis: “Become a lifelong learner and succeed at work”
    https://opensource.com/open-organization/19/7/informal-learning-adaptability
    Views: 1,027

Additional metrics:

Page views for July: 14,539 (June: 13,549; May: 13,812)

Organize for Innovation downloads in July: 57 (June: 291; May: 45)
Workbook downloads in July: 40 (June: 45; May: 40)
Guide to IT Culture Change downloads in July: 50 (June: 77; May: 60)
Leaders Manual downloads in July: 42 (June: 76; May: 54)
Field Guide downloads in July: 34 (June: 50; May: 41)

Open Organization Definition downloads in July: 25 (June: 19; May: 20)

{4} Monthly Highlights

The next book in the Open Organization book series, The Open Organization Guide for Educators: Transformative teaching and learning for a rapidly changing world, is one month away from its planned September launch. Editors are now performing final editorial work, and cover designs are nearly complete. Anyone interested in helping proofread the book can pitch in at the project’s GitHub repository.[1]

-=-=-

[1] https://github.com/open-organization-ambassadors/open-org-educators-guide

{5} Looking Ahead

The next meeting of the Open Organization Ambassadors will occur on August 15 at 09:00 Eastern / 13:00 UTC / 15:00 CEST. Meeting notes are now available and ambassadors can edit them to add agenda items.[1]

Open Organization Ambassadors are preparing to converge on Raleigh for All Things Open 2019 in October. Ambassadors will attend the conference, participate in a community planning workshop, and staff the Open Organization booth on the expo hall floor, where they’ll be able to discuss culture- and process-focused challenges with attendees.[2]

-=-=-

[1] August 15, 2019 Meeting
[2] https://allthingsopen.org/

{6} Ambassador Notes

Ron McFarland writes:

“I’ve working on a nuclear power decommissioning project here in Japan. That has got me exploring IV Generation Nuclear Power (advanced nuclear reactors). This research has been going for several years now. It is very much in an ‘open organization,’ information sharing forward between a lot of start-ups. I’m writing a case study on what I’ve learned so far.”

-=-=-

Jen Kelchner writes:

"I created and led a Learning Lab pilot for a global organization’s historic event held in Manila in June. The Learning Lab kicked off on Day 1 with a seminar-style introduction to the speed of innovation, open principles, and why transformation efforts are easier today than ever before. The 250 influencers (from 6 continents) who participated in the Lab returned on Day 2 and 3 to not only learn collaborative problem-solving techniques and how to cross collaborate—culturally and across channels—but also to learn, hands-on, how to model open principles and conduct learning communities. Resources used in the lab were opened so that each influencer could take the practices back into their marketplaces and communities. The Learning Lab hosted 250+ participants, 32 individual labs working on 19 different workplace-related issues, and boasted a ~90% met/exceeded expectations.

Feedback is still coming in, however, the consistent message is that the Learning Lab was the most impactful moment of the week-long Global Workplace Forum.

The real excitement for me was when participants wanted to know how to adapt open principles and practices for education, churches, and even mental health practice. I’ve always seen the true value of the principles of open being applied as a problem solver for human connection issues over technology building; but, then again my specialty is human dynamics. I believe the open-source community gave birth to a core set of values that can absolutely change the world and solve big challenges."

-=-=-

++ (END) ++

(See you in September!—BB)